Review: The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Chronicles of Tania

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I listened to this as an audio book. It’s only an hour and a half, so this sized book works better as an audio book than modern books which are too long.
The book is totally different from the movie. Usually the movies match to around 70-80% of the book. In this case, it’s about 10-15% of the book. I’ve never come across a book so mismatched to the movie! It was good non-the-less with a different ending.

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Review: The Silkworm

Chronicles of Tania

The Silkworm
The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I listened to this as an audio book which affects the rating I’ve given. The broad Cornish/Somersetshire accent used for Cormoran Strike was distracting and didn’t resonate with what I thought he would sound like, but the rest of the voices used were ok. I was put-off Cormoran in this second book in the series where he uses a sideline character in a pathetic attempt to get over his hang up on losing his unsuitable girlfriend Charlotte. Had he continued to suffer in silence, there would have been more respect for the character, but as it was I lost sympathy for the main character. His assistant Robin however, garners more respect in this second book as she stands up for herself with her self focused fiance. The romantic tension between Cormoran and Robin is tackled well.
This book has…

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Review: The Sirens of Surrentum

Chronicles of Tania

The Sirens of Surrentum
The Sirens of Surrentum by Caroline Lawrence
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is mistitled. It should have been ‘Satyr of Surrentum’ or ‘Lecher of Surrentum’ or ‘Nymphomaniac of Surrentum’ since it’s about a man who sleeps with most women in Naples and is so respected and above the law that no one can say or do anything (least of all the women). An abuse of power over women leads Flavia, the lead character to reassess that her infatuation is not a nice man. The pedophile fascination is disturbing. But I guess this is a good way of teaching appropriate boundaries to children and that they can say ‘no’ to adults. This book has adult themes and it’s interesting to see what passes as childrens literature these days. Makes the childrens books in my time seem so innocent and tame!

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Review: The Fugitive from Corinth

Chronicles of Tania

The Fugitive from Corinth
The Fugitive from Corinth by Caroline Lawrence
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Murder, mystery and mayhem!
The lead protagonist Flavia has to come to terms with her judgmental and short sighted nature and realise all is not as it seems initially in black and white terms and that she should be more cautious and listen to her friends. The friendships are tested but all ends well. Wonderful view into ancient Greece and the Acropolis.

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Review: The Darkest Hour

Chronicles of Tania

The Darkest Hour
The Darkest Hour by Barbara Erskine
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Normally I don’t enjoy World War 2 books, but I really enjoyed this one with the descriptions of the air fields and spitfires, the lives of the pilots, the constant air raids etc. This time the heroines Evie (1940s) and Lucy (present day) weren’t as self-centred, helpless and wimpish as the usual Erskine heroines, though they both had some moments of ‘princess behaviour’ in the book which made me cringe. Amazingly, the other characters put up with them and don’t seem to notice! I am always astonished by this and find it a bit unbelievable.
The antagonist Eddie was a great ‘evil’ character and the father was frustratingly obtuse and selfish with regards to his daughter Evie. Christopher the banker was stereotyped as a greedy grabbing gold digger. we see too much of this character in the press…

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Review: The King’s Curse

Chronicles of Tania

The King's Curse
The King’s Curse by Philippa Gregory
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

An enjoyable read from the perspective of Countess of Salisbury, Margaret Pole from the Plantagenet old royal family and cousin to the Tudors. Henry VIII is portrayed as a spoiled child who became a scary, murdering despot. Interestingly, in the author note at the back, Phillipa thinks he may have had the Kell positive blood type and McLeod Syndrome which led to all the miscarriages, lack of surviving male heir, mental instability and wild mood swings (the King’s curse). Of course medieval doctors would not have understood that and would have used leeches and astrology to’cure’ him, making him more of a lunatic.

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